3 of the Worst Cavity Causing Activities

January 17, 2019

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Cavities are the most prevalent disease affecting children in the United States, but cavities are nearly 100% preventable. Here are some of the worst activities for teeth that can lead to cavities.

1 – Not Brushing Twice Per Day 

Avoiding cavities begins with proper, routine oral care. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry advises that everyone brushes their teeth twice per day, for two minutes each session. By brushing for the proper amount of time, you help ensure that your child is cleaning all of the bad bacteria off of their teeth and preventing cavities. Be sure that they brush the entire surface of their teeth, including the backs of teeth – which is often neglected. 

2 – Too Much Sugar 

We all know that too much sugar can cause tooth decay. But how does it work? When you consume sugar, bad bacteria in your mouth feeds off of it and create acids that destroy tooth enamel. Try limiting the amount of sugar your child eats to keep their enamel strong and prevent cavities. Additionally, reduce the amount of starchy carbs that they consume (like bread and chips) to keep teeth strong. When left in the mouth for too long, starchy carbs eventually turn into sugar and fuel bad bacteria.

A good place to start cutting back on sugar intake is in the beverages that your child enjoys. Try to avoid fruit juice, sports drinks and colas, which all contain a high amount of sugar.

3 – Not Enough Water 

Did you know that fruit juices contain about as much sugar as a bottle of cola? If your child is drinking too much fruit juice – or anything other than water – then it is providing sugary fuel that cavities need to thrive.

Water is one of the best things for a healthy mouth. Did you know that saliva is 99% water, or that saliva is critical in the fight against cavities? This makes it imperative that your child drinks plenty of water so that they can keep their enamel strong, and stay cavity-free. By drinking enough water, your child can avoid dry mouth and ensure that their saliva is produced at an optimal rate. 

Fight Cavities with Proper Dental Care 

Your child should visit our dental office once every six months for a routine checkup. This checkup allows us to get ahead of any oral health issues that may be occurring, and helps them maintain a healthier smile that lasts a lifetime.

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